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Featured Courses

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ANTY 101 - Anthropology & the Human Experience

Semester: Autumn/Spring 2014
CRN: ANTY 101
Location: TBD
Professor: Randy Skelton (first session), John Douglas (second session)

Description:

 Course journeys through "deep time" to examine the origins of humans and crisscrosses the globe to find similarities and differences between socielites that highlight the essential elements of humans and their societies. 



May 27-June 27, June 30-August 1



M-Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

ANTY 210 - Intro to Physical Anthropology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: ANTY 210
Location: WWW
Professor: Ashley McKeown

Description:

Full Summer Session Course 



Course provides an introduction to human evolutionary biology including processes of evolution, primate studies, hominid paleontology, and human variation.



May 27-August 1

ANTY 330X - Native Peoples of the Interior Northwest

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: ANTY 330X, Sec 50
Location: WWW
Professor: Richard Sattler

Description:

This course provides a general overview of the native peoples and cultures of the Interior Northwest or Plateau Culture Area. The course reviews the history and prehistory of the region, the traditional cultures, and the contemporary situation of the native societies. We will examine traditional social and political organization, economic and subsistence systems, religion and world view and how these have changed over time. We will also discuss current issues confronting the peoples of the region.





ANTY 427 - Anthropology of Gender

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: ANTY 427, Sec 50
Location: WWW
Professor: Richard Sattler

Description:

 This course provides an in-depth introduction to anthropological approaches to the study of gender. We will examine the history of anthropological approaches, as well as examining contemporary issues and topics. The course focuses on the cultural construction of gender and the intersections of gender with other aspects of social organization, belief, and cultural practice across a broad array of cultures. Topics include socializing; marriage, family and descent; sexuality; religion and ideology; wealth, work and property; power and politics; and globalization and development. 

ANTY 467 - Archaeological Field School in British Columbia

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: ANTY 467, sec 1, 2
Location: Lillooet, B.C.
Professor: Anna Prentiss

Description:

 Course takes place in two 5 credit sessions (May 21-June 13 and June 16-July 9). Students may enroll in either or both. 



The course requires travel to Lillooet, British Columbia for participation in a major archaeological excavation partially funded by the National Endwoment for the Humanities. The field school counts as "Methods" course under the anthropology major and archaeology option requirements. 



To apply for the field school, please contact Dr. Anna Prentiss (anna.prentiss@umontana.com).

BIOB 101N - Discover Biology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOB 101N, 2 sections
Location: WWW, Lecture & Lab
Professor: Frank Rosenzweig

Description:

Contemporary exploration of the organizaiton and complexity of living organisms and the system in which they live. The central question of biology--relationships between form and function, acquisition and use of energy, and continuity between generations--will be addressed through lectures and laboratory investigations.



Credit not allowed toward a major in biology. Credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and BIOB 160N.  



May 27-August 1





BIOB 160N - Principles of Living Systems

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOB 160N
Location: HS 102, 207
Professor: TBA

Description:

 Course unifyies principles of biological structure-function relationships at different levels of organization and complexity. Consideration of reproduction, genetics, development, evolution, ecosystems, as well as the inter-relationships of the human species to the rest of life. Lab experiences illustrate biological principles underlying growth, reproduction, development, genetics and physiology. 



Credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and 160N.



June 30-August 1



TWR 1:30pm-3:20pm HS 102



MTWR 11:30am-1:20pm HS 207

BIOB 170N/171N - Principles of Biological Diversity

Semester: Summer 2014
Location: HS 411
CRN: BIOB 170N/171N
Professor: Greg Peters

Description:

Course surveys the diversity, evolution and ecology of life including prokaryotes, viruses, protista, fungi, plants and animals.



May 27-June 27



M-Th  11:30am-1:20pm HS 411



BIOB 171N - Lab



May 27-June 27



TWR 7:30am-11:20am NS 203

BIOB 260 - Cellular and Molecular Biology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOB 260
Location: HS 207
Professor: TBA

Description:

Course explores the structure and function of the cell, the fundamental unit of life, with an emphasis on energy transformations and information flow. Topics include molecular building blocks, membranes, organelles, and mechanisms of replication, gene expression, metabolism, signal transduction, cell birth, cell death and cell differentiation.



Prerequisites for Course: BIOB 160N, BCH 110/111, BIOH 112 (B- or higher), CHMY 123 OR CHMY 143



May 27-August 1



TWR 5:10pm-6:50pm  HS 207 

BIOB 272 - Genetics and Evolution

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOB 272
Location: ISB 110
Professor: Cerisse Allen

Description:

 Course examines the principles and mechanisms of inheritance and evolution. Topics include population genetics, fossil record, macroevolution, speciation, extinction, systematics, and molecular evolution. 



Prerequisites for Course: BIOB 260, OR BIOB 160N + BIOB 170N/171N, AND M 121, 122, 151, 162, 171.



May 27-August 1



M-Th 3:30pm-5:00pm  ISB 110

BIOH 365 - Human API for Health Professions

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOH 365
Location: HS 207, 101
Professor: Laurie Minns

Description:

Course examines the fundamental facts and concepts of the anatomy and physiology of cells and tissues, the integumentary, musculoskeletal, nervous and special senses with an emphasis on clinical application for students preparing for careers in health care. Laboratory component includes presentation of cadaver prosections and models.



Prerequisite for Course: CHMY 121N OR CHMY 141N; BIOB 160N OR BIOH 112 OR 113. 



May 27-August 1



MW 9:30am-11:20am  HS 207



AND



T 9:20am-11:20am HS 101



OR



T 11:30am-1:20pm HS 101

BIOM 250N - Microbiology for Health Sciences

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOM 250N
Location: ISB 110
Professor: Jay Pollock

Description:

Course examines infection diseases, including concepts of virulence, resistance, prevention and control of microbial diseases in the individual and in the community. If laboratory experience is desired, students may enroll concurrently in BIOM 251.



Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.



June 30-August 1



M-Th 7:30am-9:20am ISB 110 

BIOO 335 - Rocky Mountain Flora

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: BIOO 335
Location: HS 411, NS 202
Professor: Greg Peters

Description:

Course examines elements of the evolution, geography and natural affinities of flowering plants using manual of native plants of Montana.



Prerequisite for Course: One college-level course in Biology or upon consent of instructor.



June 30-August 1



TWR 8:10am-10:00am HS 411 (Lecture)



TWR 10:10-12:00pm NS 202 (Lab) 

CSCI 172 - Intro to Computer Modeling

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: CSCI 172
Location: WWW
Professor: Yolanda Reimer

Description:

 Course introduces problem-solving and data-modeling using computer productivity software. Emphasizes spreadsheet and database use in analyzing data. 



May 27-June 27

ENSC 101N - Environmental Science

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: ENSC 101N, Sec 50
Location: WWW
Professor: Matt Erickson

Description:

 Course covers the same topics and fullfils the same requirements as the classroom version of ENSC 105N. 

EVST 396 - Supervised Internship PEAS

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: EVST 396
Location: TBD
Professor: Josh Slotnick

Description:

 Course comprised of four, 4-hour days of work on the PEAS farm, with one hour of formal class time and a field trip each Friday to an area farm. Formal class portion focuses on Agro-ecology considering a production oriented system from the vantage point of ecology. Students will examine crucial scientific production issues, including soil fertility, weed management, crop physiology, and pest management in light of the health of the whole system. As season progresses, students will assume more of the decision-making responsibility at the farm. 



By August, students will know the major vegetable crop families and understand their culture. They will be familiar with common techniques for building soil, and dealing with local pest populations. Students will also gain an appreciation for the tight Western Montana growing season and learn some strategies to work within those limitations. 



Each day, two students make lunch for the rest of the class using food we have been growing at the farm. 



8:00am-12:00pm (typically runs over)

GPHY 317 - Geomorphology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: GPHY 317
Location: TBD
Professor: Caleb Pan

Description:

 This course will study and discuss landscapes and the processes that shape them. this course will explore the influence of landforms and landscapes on human activities and about humans' impact on landscapes through history.



The topic  requires some understanding of tectonics, volcanism, structural geology, climate, hydrology, glaciology and others. Thus, students should already have taken GPHY 111N prior to enrolling in this course. 



 



June 9-July 10



M-Th  9:30am-11:20am   Stone Hall

HSTR 352 - France in Revolution 1789-1848

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: HSTR 352, Sec 1
Location: LA 203
Professor: Linda Frey

Description:

Course discusses the political, economic and social upheaval and development of French Revolution Era. 



May 27-June 27



M-Th 7:30am-9:20am  LA 203

HSTR 357 - Russia to 1881

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: HSTR 357, Sec 30
Location: NAC 103
Professor: Robert H. Greene

Description:

Course emphasizes the autocratic political tradition, Westernization and territorial expansion in Russia through 1881.



June 30-August 1



M-Th 9:30am-11:20am  NAC 103 

HSTR 363 - Eastern Europe: Life and Death on the Eastern Front 1939-1945

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: HSTR 363, Sec 50
Location: WWW
Professor: Robert H. Greene

Description:

Course will make use of primary sources, wartime documents, scholarly works, memoirs and diaries, visual arts, literature and film to examine the impact of war and occupation on the lives of ordinary men and women on the eastern front. We will discuss a few battles, but most of our attention will be on the mechanics and rhythms of life and survival, resistance and collaboration, commemoration and loss. Our primary geographical focus will be on the present-day states of Poland, Lithuania, Ukraine, Belarus and Russia



May 27-August 1 

LING 470 - Linguistic Analysis

Semester: Summer 2014
Location: WWW
Professor: Leora Bar-el

Description:

Second Summer Session Course.



In this course we look at the formal properties of language and the ways these properties are studied by linguists: phonetics (sounds of language), phonology (sound patterns), morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (meaning). We will look at data from across the world’s languages and ask questions such as “What does it mean to know a language?”

  The course as no prerequisites.

 

M 191 - Discrete Mathematics

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: M 191
Location: TBD
Professor: Jenny McNulty

Description:

 What is the best way to visit all the cities in Montana?



How does a GPS Navigation system find the "best route" between two cities?



What is the probability of winning the MT Lottery 10 Spot?



The answers to these and other questions will be studied in this course on discrete mathematics. Students who enjoy solving puzzles, tinkering with problems and being exposed to new ideas, and who want to broaden their knowledge of mathematics to increase their problem-solving skills should enroll. Inquiry-based exploration and group problem-solving will be emphasized.



June 15-27

PSCI 210S - Intro to American Government

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: PSCI 210S
Location: LA 205
Professor: Patrick Peel

Description:

 Second Summer Session Course.



Course examines constitutional principles, structures, and the political processes of the national goverment.



11:30am-1:20pm

PSCI 220S - Intro to Comparative Government

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: PSCI 220S
Location: LA 337
Professor: Abhishek Chatterjee

Description:

 First Summer Session Course.



Course introduces the basic political concepts, themes, values and dilemmas as they apply to the world's diverse societies and cultures.



M-Th 1:30pm-3:20pm

PSCI 230X - Intro to International Relations

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: PSCI 230X
Location: SS 344
Professor: Eric Hines

Description:

 Second Summer Session Course.



Course reviews the evolution of the nation-state system and surveys contemporary international actors, issues and forces for stability and change.



9:30am-11:20am

PSCI 250E - Intro to Political Theory

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: PSCI 250E
Location: LA 337
Professor: Ramona Grey

Description:

 First Summer Session Course.



Course analyzes the various attempts, from Plato to Marx, to explain, instruct and justify the distribution of political power in society. Emphasis is placed upon those theories whose primary concern is to define the nature of the "good" society. 



M-Th  11:30am-1:20pm

SOCI 101S - Introduction to Sociology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: SOCI 101S
Location: SS 344
Professor: Teresa Sobieszczyk

Description:

30-June – 1-Aug 2014



9:30-11:20 MTWR



SS 344



An introduction to the world of sociology, the principles and concepts used in the study of human social interaction, groups, communities and societies.

SOCI 202 - Social Statistics

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: SOCI 202
Location: SS 258
Professor: Patrick McKay

Description:

 27-May – 27-June 2014



7:30-9:20 MTWR



SS 258



An important first statistics course for social scientists.  More than simply the mathematics and statistical logic, both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques are applied to sociological data.

SOCI 211 - Introduction to Criminology

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: SOCI 211
Location: TBD
Professor: Jackson Bunch

Description:

 27-May – 27-June 2014



7:30-9:20 MTWR



An important introduction to crime in society: how crime is defined, the extent and distribution of crime, theoretical explanations of criminal behavior, and crime control efforts.

SOCI 221 - Criminal Justice System

Semester: Autumn/Spring 2014
CRN: SOCI 221

Description:

SOCI 318 - Sociological Research Methods

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: SOCI 318
Location: TBD
Professor: Cassie Sheets

Description:

 Cassie Sheets



27-May – 27-June 2014



9:30-11:20 MTWR



An important research methods course for the social sciences.  Methods include participant observation, interviewing, experiments, surveys, content analysis, and basic data analysis.

SOCI 443 - Sociology of Poverty

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: SOCI 443
Location: NAC 103
Professor: Celia Winkler

Description:

30-June – 1-Aug 2014



1:30-3:20 MTWR



NAC 103



An examination of the roots, prevalence, and social characteristics of poverty. We also investigate further the policies intended to end poverty.

SOCI 455 - Classical Sociological Theory

Semester: Autumn/Spring 2014
CRN: SOCI 455
Location: TBD
Professor: Cassie Sheets

Description:

 30-June – 1-Aug 2014



9:30-11:20 MTWR



A summary course in the classical theories of social science.  We focus on the historical development of the field of sociology from 1850 to World War I and emphasize the classical writings of Marx, Durkheim, and Weber.

WGSS 263 - Intro to Women's and Gender Studies

Semester: Summer 2014
CRN: WGSS 263
Location: WWW
Professor: Hillary Gleason

Description:

Course provides a broad overview of gender and women's issues from a social science perspective. Relevant topics related to the sociological and psychological aspects of gender across culture are explored, including masculinity, femininity, violence, reproductive health, cultural diversity in the expression of gender, issues in sexual orientation, and media contributions to these issues.